Mastering the Elevator Pitch

Mastering your elevator pitch is both an art and a science. It’s not a task you should take lightly, as your elevator pitch could make or break your career. Your elevator pitch is often your first impression to potential business partners, investors, clients, employers and all other professionals.

 

From time-tested guidelines to recent trends, here are the best practices for mastering your elevator pitch.

 

Timing Is Everything

Busy professionals can’t waste a minute of their precious time. We’ve all been told that an elevator pitch shouldn’t exceed 30-seconds, but is someone really going to intently listen for that long? Recent research suggests that an adult’s attention span averages only 8 seconds. Instead of trying to cram your entire resume into the shrinking amount of time someone will listen to you, shift your focus to what really matters. You want them to know what you do, what you need, and who you are.

 

Know Your Audience

Your elevator pitch is quite literally all about you, but that doesn’t mean it shouldn’t be tailored to your audience. Tell them what they should know in a way that will hold their attention. You want to leave the best, most memorable impression in the short amount of time you have. If the person you’re speaking to genuinely cares about what you’re saying, that’s immeasurably better than them just passively listening. They’re also more likely to remember you.

 

Showcase Your Expertise

The more trustworthy you prove yourself to be, the more likely someone will buy into what you’re pitching – even if what you’re pitching is yourself or your company. However, rattling off a list of accomplishments sounds boastful, so you should construct a 1-2 sentence story that demonstrates your expertise. It could be how you’re solving a large problem or why you’re uniquely qualified to do so.

 

Be Confident

Even if you are not actually confident, you need to act confident. If you’re anxious, that will come off in your pitch. As cliche as it sounds, you should practice your elevator pitch in front of a mirror or trusted friends. The only way to tell how others might perceive you in conversation is to see for yourself. In addition, repeatedly practicing your elevator pitch will make you more comfortable when delivering it to a real person.  

 

Although a lot is riding on the perfect elevator pitch, remember to take a deep breath and relax before starting the conversation. You’re probably more knowledgeable about your subject matter than the person you’re speaking to. If you’re lucky, you might get some follow-up questions from whomever you’re pitching to, and being prepared for those questions is just as important as the elevator pitch itself.

Here’s Why Employee Morale Matters More Than You Think

Employee morale is not just a passing trend or something that you should pay mere lip service towards. While there might be a distinction between work and home for you and your employees, employees need to feel cared for and supported in their position at your company. Low employee morale means that your workplace can feel hostile in many regards. The guide below will walk you through reasons why employee morale matters more than you think.

 

Health

People are focused on staying healthy in many ways, from what they eat to what they touch, the workplace is a major part of that daily routine. Work-related stress (as well as other factors) can trigger depression, anxiety, and much more. No workplace should push employees to the brink– making them feel worried and unwell. No company should ever expect a good output from an employee who is working under tremendous pressure. Improving employee morale can reduce work-related stress factors and increase the overall health of employees.

 

Productivity

Having people work more doesn’t mean that they’re going to be more productive. It might seem like they get more done, but in reality, the quality is inferior. Demanding employees to meet intense quotas means they’re going to be harried and unlikely to adhere to quality. Productivity should be championed in a proper manner. Employers should take pride in employees for not how fast they work but rather, how well they work.

 

Feeling Welcomed

The workplace needs to be distinct from other aspects of an employee’s life. There are things that shouldn’t be discussed at work, such as off-color and divisive topics. However, employees should feel comfortable in their work environment. In highest priority, proper treatment and respect of people in the workplace is a great way to improve morale. Managers should take the time to learn about their employees and invest in understanding them as individuals. Even if it’s just a casual acquaintanceship, a manager can forge a decent bond with employees and make them feel like they are known and cared about.

 

Retention

If employees aren’t satisfied in a workplace, they’re going to leave. While it may not be instantaneous, their dissatisfaction can easily be spotted. High turnover is a huge indicator of low morale. It’s crucial to promote employee morale in order to keep a business thriving. This isn’t just for the benefit of a company; it’s also for the benefit of the people.

The Hidden Aspects of Burnout

Graham Zahoruiko Burnout Blog

 

Many people who enter the business world are hard driving go-getters. They want to succeed, and are willing to push themselves in order to gain this success. In the business world, this type of attitude is generally applauded. After all, who wouldn’t want to go into business with someone who is hardworking and proven their business hustle?

 

As with all efforts, however, there is a price to pay. Even if someone enjoys their work, constant work and stress definitely has consequences. The tricky part about these consequences, however, is that many times they are cumulative. In other words, it takes a while for their true effects to be seen, and their source may not even be obvious because they’ve slowly increased over time. What is the actual source, however? The answer: burnout.

 

So what is burnout, exactly? In her article in Psychology Today, Paula Davis-Laack defines burnout as being out of sync with one or more aspects of your life chronically. Many times in business, this means that your work is taking over your entire life, and other aspects of who you are could be threatened and neglected. The article cites research that showed how work over-load was one of the common ways that people reach burnout, among other reasons.

 

In many ways, what relates the different paths to burnout is similar: chronic stress. Stress can come from a variety of sources, be it relationships, careers or negative encounters with people. With the level on connectedness that technology offers today, many people are simply overwhelmed by thousands of small stresses that occur over the course of a day. When days add up into weeks, and then months, the level of stress can build to a burnout. Burnout can have negative impacts on relationships and motivation due to its affect on your body and mind.

 

Because of how long burnout takes to develop, it can remain hidden for quite a while. Soon enough, however, the negative consequences of constant stress on your health and state of mind, as well as relationships, will start to show. At that point, its best to take a pause, relax and evaluate your life. Do you really need to be working 75 hour weeks? Are there toxic relationships you need to cut out or drastically modify? These types of questions can help recenter you on what is important and what is not.